§ 805.  Communication in connection with debt collection   [15 USC 1692c]

(c) CEASING COMMUNICATION.  If a consumer notifies a debt collector in writing that the consumer refuses to pay a debt or that the consumer wishes the debt collector to cease further communication with the consumer, the debt collector shall not communicate further with the consumer with respect to such debt, except --

(1) to advise the consumer that the debt collector's further efforts are being terminated;

(2) to notify the consumer that the debt collector or creditor may invoke specified remedies which are ordinarily invoked by such debt collector or creditor; or

(3) where applicable, to notify the consumer that the debt collector or creditor intends to invoke a specified remedy.

If such notice from the consumer is made by mail, notification shall be complete upon receipt.

Debt collectors routinely violate the consumer protection laws that are in place that prohibit debt collection harassment and abuse. They routinely violate the laws because  they know they will collect more money from consumers by doing so. Debt collectors also know that most consumers do not know or understand the laws that are in place to protect them, or believe if the consumer did know about these laws, that they lack the resources to fight back.

The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) (15 U.S.C. §1692 et seq.) prohibits debt collectors from engaging in a wide range of abusive and harassing conduct. There are many things that a debt collector often does or fails to do that violate the FDCPA.

Here are some common FDCPA violations perpetrated by debt collectors:

  1. Contacting a debtor who is represented by an attorney.
  2. Failing to warn a debtor that the communication is from a debt collector and that any information obtained will be used to collect a debt.
  3. Failing to warn on all subsequent communications that they are from a debt collector.
  4. Calling the debtor an unreasonable number of times daily or after they have been instructed to stop calling.
  5. Using profane, foul, or obscene language.
  6. Making racial, religious, or sexual slurs.
  7. Yelling or screaming at the debtor.
  8. Engaging in name calling.
  9. Falsely threatening a lawsuit.
  10. Falsely threatening to ruin a debtor’s credit.Debt collectors routinely violate the consumer protection laws that are in place that prohibit debt collection harassment and abuse. They routinely violate the laws because  they know they will collect more money from consumers by doing so. Debt collectors also know that most consumers do not know or understand the laws that are in place to protect them, or believe if the consumer did know about these laws, that they lack the resources to fight back.

    The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) (15 U.S.C. §1692 et seq.) prohibits debt collectors from engaging in a wide range of abusive and harassing conduct. There are many things that a debt collector often does or fails to do that violate the FDCPA.
    Here are some common FDCPA violations perpetrated by debt collectors:

  11. Contacting a debtor who is represented by an attorney.
  12. Failing to warn a debtor that the communication is from a debt collector and that any information obtained will be used to collect a debt.
  13. Failing to warn on all subsequent communications that they are from a debt collector.
  14. Calling the debtor an unreasonable number of times daily or after they have been instructed to stop calling.
  15. Using profane, foul, or obscene language.
  16. Making racial, religious, or sexual slurs.
  17. Yelling or screaming at the debtor.
  18. Engaging in name calling.
  19. Falsely threatening a lawsuit.
  20. Falsely threatening to ruin a debtor’s credit.

To see more FDCPA violation examples go to our Resources Section under 'Documents'